Linus Pauling and the Structure of Proteins: A Documentary History All Documents and Media  
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Key Participants


William T. Astbury
George W. Beadle
John Desmond Bernal
William Lawrence Bragg
Herman R. Branson
Dan H. Campbell
William B. Castle
Robert B. Corey
Francis H. C. Crick
Max Delbrück
Emil Fischer
Frank Blair Hanson
Maurice Huggins
Harvey A. Itano
John C. Kendrew
Karl Landsteiner
Alfred E. Mirsky
Carl G. Niemann
Linus Pauling
Max F. Perutz
Frederick Sanger
S. Jonathan Singer
Theodor (The) Svedberg
Alexander R. Todd
Warren Weaver
Dorothy Wrinch

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J. D. Bernal
J. D. Bernal, 1971.
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John Desmond Bernal

1901-1971

Papers of John Desmond Bernal
Location: Department of Manuscripts, Cambridge University
Address: Cambridge University Library, West Road, Cambridge CB3 9DR, United Kingdom
Size: 118 boxes, 8 rolls, 2 volumes, 1 packet, and 1 envelope
Phone: +44 (0)1223 333143  
Email: mss@lib.cam.ac.uk  Web: http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/deptserv/manuscripts/index.html

Bernal, Professor John Desmond (1901-1971)
Location: Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives
Address: Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS, United Kingdom
Size: 1 file
Finding Aid: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/lhcma/summary/be55-001.shtml
Phone: +44 020 7848 1843  
Email: specialcollections@kcl.ac.uk  Web: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/library/collections/archivespec/collections/lhcma.aspx

 

Correspondence

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Quotes

"[Pauling] had already proved himself in the early years to have such an ingrown sense of the realities of the quantum as applied to chemistry that he did not need to think about detailed derivations but thought automatically in quantum terms."

J. D. Bernal. "The Pattern of Linus Pauling's Work in Relation to Molecular Biology." Structural Chemistry and Molecular Biology: A Volume Dedicated to Linus Pauling By His Students, Colleagues and Friends (San Francisco: W. H. Freeman). 1968.

"It can be said that, by and large, Pauling's idea played an essential role in the working out of protein structure. But it did far more. It broke away from the limitation imposed by crystallographers on the integral nature of the turns of a helix. It eventually led to a new generalization of crystallography that was to have immense repercussions. It might be said, 'Only a crystallographer could have predicted this development, but if they were good crystallographers, they would have been bound to reject it.' Indeed, Pauling's generalization opened the field to a new and much more wide-sweeping account of semiregular structures that are similar to the helical."

J. D. Bernal. "The Pattern of Linus Pauling's Work in Relation to Molecular Biology." Structural Chemistry and Molecular Biology: A Volume Dedicated to Linus Pauling By His Students, Colleagues and Friends (San Francisco: W. H. Freeman). 1968.

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