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Oregon State University
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Oregon State University Cultural Centers Oral History Collection, 2013-2015View associated digital content.

The Oregon State University Cultural Centers Oral History Collection consists of interviews conducted with undergraduate and graduate student staff members of three OSU cultural centers - the Native American Longhouse, the Asian & Pacific Cultural Center and the Women's Center - as well as an administrator who oversees all of the university's cultural centers. Documented within the collection are interviewees' thoughts on working in the centers, the purpose and future direction of the organizations, and negotiating life as a student of color at OSU.
ID: OH 021
Extent: 0.0
More Extent Information
Scope and Content Notes
Biographical / Historical Notes
Statement on Access: Collection is open for research.
Arrangement
Preferred Citation: Oregon State University Cultural Centers Oral History Collection (OH 021), Oregon State University Special Collections and Archives Research Center, Corvallis, Oregon.
Acquisition Note: All interviews were conducted by OSU Libraries Special Collections & Archives Research Center staff, sometimes in concert with other colleagues as indicated.
Acquired: Future additions documenting each of Oregon State University's four cultural centers are expected.
Languages of Materials
Other

Container List

Series 1: Native American Longhouse Interviews, 2013 Add to Shelf
Extent: 7 sound files
Digital File 1: Parish, Hali'a, May 21, 2013 Add to Shelf

At the time of this interview, Hali'a Parish was an office assistant at the Native American Longhouse. A junior studying Business, Parish came to OSU from her hometown of Kapolei, Hawaii on the island of O'ahu.

Parish discusses her experiences and personal growth working on campus in the Native American Longhouse; her thoughts on the importance of diversity development in OSU and the local community; the joys and challenges of learning the Native American culture; the success of NAL participation in events such as Heritage Month, Connect Week, the annual Salmon Bake and the Grand Opening of the new Native American Longhouse; the September retreat in Salem for cultural centers staff; the opening of the new longhouse and the sense of community within; her ideas for Native Hawaiian activities, collaboration with the Polynesian Culture Club and Hui o Hawai'i, and outreach to the local population; her advice to future longhouse staff; and her experiences as a Native Hawaiian both in Hawaii and at OSU. [Interview conducted by Natchee Barnd]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:24:04
Digital File 2: López, Carmen, May 22, 2013 Add to Shelf

At the time of this interview, Carmen López was an office assistant at the Native American Longhouse. A junior double-majoring in Human Development & Family Sciences and Spanish, López came to OSU from her hometown of The Dalles, Oregon.

López discusses her experience working as an office assistant at NAL and learning about Native cultures; the NAL booth on Earth Day; the Salmon Bake event; the importance of salmon and camas to the tribes of the Pacific Northwest and the need to better communicate the meaning of salmon, camas, and dream catchers to event attendees; her experiences as a non-Native member of the staff; her feelings on missing the old Quonset hut; her advice for future non-Native NAL staff and any staff working in cultural centers they don't racially or ethnically identify with; the significance of the full name of the new Longhouse; her ideas about the NAL collaborating with the 4Cs; and the positive effect of OSU on her personal identity as Latina, Mexicana, and Chicana. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:22:30
Digital File 3: Cárdenas, Daniel, May 23, 2013 Add to Shelf

At the time of this interview, Daniel Cárdenas was a graduate teaching assistant at the Native American Longhouse. A first-year graduate student in College Student Services Administration, Cárdenas came to OSU from his hometown of Fair Oaks, California.

Cárdenas discusses the challenges, responsibilities, and growth he has experienced working as a graduate teaching assistance in the Longhouse; the events of Native Heritage Month; the planning and challenges of opening and moving into the new Longhouse; the annual Pow Wow thrown by the Native American Student Association; relationships with other cultural centers staff; ideas for inter-cultural center collaboration; the Oregon One Percent for Art law and the art in the new Longhouse, including the art of artist Shirod Younker; the importance of honoring intersecting identities; the generosity of the local Native community; ideas about bringing in Native language speakers, visiting other longhouses and building ties with the nine tribes of Oregon; and OSU's impact on his personal racial, ethnic, and spiritual identity. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:55:02
Digital File 4: Alradhi, Nadia, May 23, 2013 Add to Shelf

At the time of this interview, Nadia Alradhi was an activities coordinator at the Native American Longhouse. A senior in Public Health, Alradhi came to OSU from her hometown of Estacada, Oregon.

Alradhi, a member of the Karuk Tribe of Northern California, describes her experiences as Activities Coordinator at the Native American Longhouse (NAL) and Secretary of the Native American Student Association (NASA). She discusses planning NAL activities; bringing events to OSU dorms; the challenge of advertising the NAL as available for non-natives as well as natives; NASA Pow Wow planning and Jim Thorpe's 5k Dash for Diabetes; the challenges of learning more about other native tribes; the Transforming Columbus Day event in collaboration with the Centro Cultural César Chávez; interacting and collaborating with other cultural centers; the addition of "Eena Haws" to the Longhouse name; her hope to bring back the "Calling All Natives" outreach event; advice for future staff; the effect of racism on her grandfather; the Longhouse impact on her as a Native student; negative comments from non-natives; her suggestions to get more exposure for NAL; her experience as an informal advocate for natives; and her wish for NAL and NASA to collaborate more. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:38:38
Digital File 5: Huhndorf, Mariah, May 30, 2013 Add to Shelf

At the time of this interview, Mariah Huhndorf was an activities coordinator at the Native American Longhouse. A junior General Science major studying to become a physician's assistant, Huhndorf came to OSU from her hometown of Kenai, Alaska.

Huhndorf, a native Alaskan with an Athabaskan mother and Yupik father, describes her experiences at Oregon State University, both as a student and as an activities coordinator at the Native American Longhouse. She discusses Longhouse events, such as the Alaska Winter Games, which she coordinated; the challenges and solutions that NAL staff have experienced with communication; her suggestions that staff learn more about events hosted at the NAL by other groups and work to make it clear that the NAL welcomes all visitors, native or not; what the new Longhouse means to her; how OSU and the NAL have affected her own identity as a native Alaskan; the importance of sharing stories; and the "culture shock" she felt coming to Corvallis, with a population of about 54,700, from her hometown of Kenai, Alaska, with a population of about 7,000. [Interview conducted by Natchee Barnd]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:27:46
Digital File 6: Williams, Matt, May 30, 2013 Add to Shelf

At the time of this interview, Matt Williams was the internal coordinator at the Native American Longhouse. A junior in Exercise and Sports Science, Williams came to OSU from his hometown of Winston, Oregon.

Williams, a Native American with Oglala Sioux, Cherokee and Osage heritage, discusses his experiences as a student, a Native American, and a staff member at the Native American Longhouse (NAL). His discussions include his responsibilities, experiences, and personal growth as an NAL office assistant, activities coordinator and internal coordinator; the importance of teaching about native traditions; the Indigenous Feast at the end of Heritage Month; the Jackson family from Warm Springs Reservation; the challenges of managing time as a working student; NAL collaborations with various OSU departments and his desire for relationships with more departments; Dr. Robert Thompson's talk on Native American and African American relations during the Civil War; his suggestions for future events and visits to native high schoolers; advice to future coordinators; the challenges of letting non-natives know they can use the NAL; his father's adoption away from the Pine Ridge Reservation where he was born and subsequent separation from his culture; the Nike N7 Native Americans in sport program and the importance of basketball on many native reservations; stereotypes about Native Americans; and his experience of being mixed native and having a white mother. [Interview conducted by Natchee Barnd]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:40:47
Digital File 7: Hogan, Tyler, June 3, 2013 Add to Shelf

At the time of this interview, Tyler Hogan was the external coordinator at the Native American Longhouse. A senior in Political Science, Hogan came to OSU from his hometown of Junction City, Oregon.

Hogan, a member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, talks about his responsibilities and growth as an external coordinator at the Native American Longhouse (NAL), where he was previously a volunteer, as well as his experiences as a Native American student at OSU. His discussions include the importance of the Salmon Bake event; the NAL's relationship with nearby tribes and his desire for more tribal outreach; Heritage Month events, including the Two-Spirit event and tribal resource kit; the difficulty of presenting a unified message when the NAL staff are from so many different cultures; the gathering of student input during the planning stages of the new Longhouse; what the new Longhouse means to him; his advice to future coordinators; how resilient, passionate, and empowered Native Americans are, especially when given the opportunity; the three functions of the Longhouse; the Longhouse as a "home away from home" for native students; the effect of the Longhouse on OSU and the local community; the Longhouse's contribution to personal identity development of staff and visitors; negative comments and stereotypes about Native Americans; and the N7 program's positive effect on cultural competency. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:36:09
Series 2: Asian & Pacific Cultural Center Interviews, 2014 Add to Shelf
Extent: 5 sound files
Digital File 8: Shaker, Mohamed, May 13, 2014 Add to Shelf

Mohamed Shaker was born in Singapore but his hometown is Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. At the time of this interview he was a junior studying History and Sociology.

Shaker discusses his position as a community outreach coordinator for the Asian & Pacific Cultural Center; his goals of building community between Asian students on campus; creating more engaging cultural activities; working with the Queer Studies program for combined events; struggles with scheduling and event attendance; successes of planning events with other cultural centers; relationships with other cultural centers; speaking at the APCC ground breaking; ideas for future health minded events; his thoughts on the campus Solidarity March; the challenges of losing two major API faculty members; reasons for having cultural centers; the importance of sharing stories and history; and his excitement for the coming years and new center for the APCC. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 1:12:26
Digital File 9: Parish, Hali'a, May 19, 2014 Add to Shelf

Hali'a Parish was born in Honolulu, Hawaii; her hometown is 'Ewa Beach, Hawaii on the island of O'ahu. At the time of the interview she was a senior studying Speech Communication and Innovation Management.

Parish discusses her transition from the Native American Longhouse to the Asian & Pacific Cultural Center in order to relate with shared identities and ethnicities; working as an activities coordinator at the APCC; personal challenges with time management; her other position as the Luau Coordinator for Hui O Hawai'i; successes of building friendships with other students, creating events such as "Dream Out Loud" and "Native Sands, Native Lands"; performing at the APCC ground breaking ceremony; desires for more collaboration between the cultural centers; advice to future staff; understanding her identity; and appreciation for the Diversity Development and staff. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:21:06
Digital File 10: Suzuki, Mandilyn "Mandi", May 20, 2014 Add to Shelf

Mandi Suzuki was born in Honolulu, Hawaii; her hometown is Waipahu, Hawai'i on the island of O'ahu. At the time of the interview she was a fifth year studying General Science, Pre-Physical Therapy.

Suzuki discusses her fond memories of working at the Asian & Pacific Cultural Center for the past three years; her current position as external coordinator and the role of providing a guidance support network for support staff; developing relationships with other organizations and departments on campus; the difficulties of increasing student attendance to educational events; the successes of the APCC staff; the joys of seeing the staff become more culturally competent; goals of helping her staff find their place in the world; the benefits of the location of the new center; advice for future staff; her personal growth in cultural competency and awareness; and the impact of the APCC on the community. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:37:31
Digital File 11: Yuan, Maiyee, May 21, 2014 Add to Shelf

Maiyee Yuan was born and raised in Salem, Oregon. At the time of the interview she was a third year studying Microbiology.

Yuan discusses her position as the internal coordinator for the Asian & Pacific Cultural Center; the APCC as a home and support center; learning about issues affecting Asian and Pacific Islander communities; attending various multicultural conferences; challenges with disorganization in the APCC; working with the building of the new center; goals for future events and projects; advice for future staff; insight about organization through the APCC; challenges with including a great variety of Asian cultures; the role of the APCC with the API community; and the importance of the cultural centers giving a voice to minorities on campus. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:33:36
Digital File 12: Kang, Ji-Hae, May 28, 2014 Add to Shelf

Maiyee Yuan was born in South Korea and raised in Beaverton, Oregon. At the time of the interview she was a senior studying General Science with a Chemistry minor.

Kang discusses her position as a cultural center coordinator for the Asian & Pacific Cultural Center; projects and activities including working with the center's library, listserve, scrapbook, and programs database; her personal and professional growth in her communication skills; experiences working with her fellow center coordinators; her raised awareness of micro-aggressions and the actions she has taken to educate others; her excitement for the new APCC building; advise for future staff members including to be very mindful of how they present themselves as they are representatives of the center and the need to stand up against social injustices, however small. [Interview conducted by Natalia Fernández]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:37:22
Series 3: Women's Center Interview, 2015 Add to Shelf
Extent: 1 sound file
Digital File 13: Allee, Amelia, Shelby Baisden, Soreth Dahri, and Nicthé Verdugo., May 5, 2015 Add to Shelf

Amelia Allee grew up in Denver, but calls Portland, Oregon her home. Allee is 20 years old, and self-identifies as French, English, and Huron (a Native American Tribe). This is her first year at Oregon State University as a transfer student from Portland Community College. As a junior, she is majoring in public health with a focus in health management and policy. Allee is also working towards her certificate of food and culture and social justice. Previously a student advocate at PCC's women's center, Allee began working at OSU's women's center in 2014. She is currently a peer facilitator, but will soon become the leadership liaison.

Shelby Baisden recognizes Gresham, Oregon as her hometown, but calls Portland and Corvallis her home. Baisden is 22, self-identifies as white, and is a senior at Oregon State University. She is studying human development and family sciences in the school of public health and human sciences. This is her first year working for the women's center, although she had previously collaborated with the center. She serves as the communications representative.

Soreth Dahri's hometown is Karachi, Pakistan. She self-identifies as Muslim and Pakistani. She is 21 and in her second year at Oregon State University. She is majoring in finance in the college of business. Dahri is currently a peer facilitator at the women's center, and this is her first year working for the center.

While Nicthé Verdugo lives in Corvallis, Oregon, her hometown is Chandler, Arizona. Verdugo is 22, self-identifies as Chicana, and is a senior at Oregon State University. She is majoring in ethnic studies with a minor in women, gender, and sexuality studies within the college of liberal arts. This is Verdugo's second year working at the women's center. During her first year, she served as the program coordinator, creating and organizing events. Currently she is the leadership liaison. One of her duties is to serve as a mentor for the staff of the women's center.

The interview begins by introducing four staff members of Oregon State University's women's center–Amelia Allee, Shelby Baisden, Soreth Dahri, and Nicthé Verdugo. After discussing their backgrounds, majors, and positions at the women's center, they discuss the challenges of their jobs. These challenges include white privilege and misunderstandings of feminism. They recommend sexual assault awareness and expanded definitions of feminism for future event topics. The interview then chronicles their ideas and advice for the future of the women's center. For this, the interviewees recognize open mindedness, good and purposeful intentions, non-generalizations, and challenging barriers. On a more personal level, they describe several experiences in which their identities have caused them to have both negative and positive interactions. The interview ends with an acknowledgement of the family-like environment of the staff and of the center. [Interview conducted by Amelia Allee]

Interview transcript and audio available online.

Extent: 0:27:04
Series 4: Cultural Resource Centers Administration Interview, 2015 Add to Shelf
Extent: 1 audio file
Digital File 14: Dorsette, Jason, August 28, 2015 Add to Shelf

Jason Dorsette was born in High Point, North Carolina. He attended a historically black university (HBCU) in North Carolina where he earned a bachelor's degree in history and middle grade education as well as a master's in public administration and policy. He began his career at Oregon State University as the coordinator for the Lonnie B. Harris Black Cultural Center (BCC) and is now an Associate Director within the Office of Diversity and Cultural Engagement; Dorsette oversees the university's seven cultural resource centers.

In his interview, Dorsette discusses the roles and significance of the OSU Cultural Resource Centers (CRCs). He explains the role of the CRCs' advisory councils, shares his thoughts on using the phrase "emerging group" rather than "minority group", and emphasizes that while each CRC has an affinity based agenda, the spaces are open to all and the centers collaborate with variety of university groups. Dorsette then gives the examples of his outreach to OSU fraternities and sororities as well as the local Corvallis community. He discusses the significance of the seven CRCs, the positive community response and impact, as well as some of the difficulties he and others working the CRC's face. Dorsette remarks on the need for a plan of action by the people affected by social injustice, the leadership required to create positive change, and the challenge of bridging old and new ideas and multiple generations of supporters. Dorsette concludes the interview with his thoughts on future opportunities including fundraising, intersectionality, and community engagement; the CRCs continuing work toward debunking myths about stereotypes; and an encouraging reminder to all people to ask questions and to feel welcome to visit the CRCs. [Interview conducted by Christopher Russell]

Interview audio available online.

Extent: 0:28:32
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