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Correspondence

Letter from Linus Pauling to Martin Luther King, Jr. June 21, 1965.
Pauling writes to provide an update to Dr. King concerning An Appeal by Recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize and also to inquire as to whether or not Dr. King had met Linus Pauling, Jr. at a civil rights march in Alabama.

Transcript

June 21, 1965

The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.

454 Dexter Avenue

Montgomery, Alabama

Dear Dr. King:

In April I sent you the draft of a petition, which I hoped would be signed by most of the living recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize.

In consultation with The Rt. Hon. Phillip J. Noel-Baker, M.P., I have now revised this petition. I enclose two copies of it, with the title An Appeal By Recipients of The Nobel Peace Prize.

Noel-Baker and I hope to announce, in a short while, that it has been signed by eight of the ten living recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize – Lester Pearson feels that as head of the Canadian government, it would not be proper for him to sign it, although there is the possibility that he will reconsider this decision. Ralph Bunche feels that he, as an official of the United Nations Secretariat, is precluded from signing petitions to any government.

You, of course, are not restricted in this way, and Noel-Baker and I hope very much that you will sign the appeal. Please return the signed copy to me, by airmail, as soon as possible.

I send my best wishes to you and Mrs. King.

Sincerely yours,

Linus Pauling

mjh

Enc.

PS: I do not remember whether or not I had asked you if you noticed our son, Dr. Linus Pauling, Jr., at the time of the 4-day march to Montgomery? He was present during the whole time, and was one of the five people from Hawaii who held up the large banner reading “Hawaii Knows Integration Works”. He told me that he spend most of his time during the four days giving medical treatment to marchers who were suffering from cold, exhaustion, sore feet, and other ailments – he is a practicing physician. I saw that there was a photograph of him, giving medical treatment to a patient in the article in Newsweek on the Selma-Montgomery march.

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